Sunday, June 29, 2008

Portland Literary Events

Monday, June 30
Darin Strauss will read from More Than it Hurts You
Where: Powell’s City of Books on Burnside, 1005 W Burnside
When: 7:30 p.m.
Cost: Free
For more info: http://www.powells.com/

Monday, June 30
Erik Lyle will read from On the Lower Frequencies: A Secret History of the City
Where: Powell’s Books on Hawthorne, 3723 SE Hawthorne Blvd.
When: 7:30 p.m.
Cost: Free
For more info: http://www.powells.com/

Tuesday, July 1
Zoe Ferraris will read from Finding Nouf
Where: Annie Bloom’s Bookstore, 7834 SW Capitol Highway
When: 7:30 p.m.
Cost: Free
For more info: http://www.annieblooms.com/NASApp/store/IndexJsp

Tuesday, July1
Laurie Notaro will read from The Idiot Girl and the Flaming Tantrum of Death: Reflections on Revenge, Germophobia, and Laser Hair Removal
Where: Powell’s City of Books on Burnside, 1005 W Burnside
When: 7:30 p.m.
Cost: Free
For more info: http://www.powells.com/

Wednesday, July 2
Gary Vaynerchuk will read from Gary Vaynerchuk’s 101 Wines: Guaranteed to Inspire, Delight, and Bring Thunder to Your World
Where: Powell’s Books at Cedar Hills Crossing, 3415 SW Cedar Hills Blvd
When: 7:00 p.m.
Cost: Free
For more info: http://www.powells.com/

Wednesday, July 2
Rick Shenkman will read from Just How Stupid Are We?: Facing the Truth About the American Voter
Where: Powell’s City of Books on Burnside, 1005 W Burnside
When: 7:30 p.m.
Cost: Free
For more info: http://www.powells.com/

Thursday, June 26, 2008

42 Launch Party: Celebrate with Ooligan Press

Join Ooligan Press to celebrate the release of 42!
Thursday July 10th, 2008 from 5 to 7 pm at
The Someday Lounge
125 NW 5th Avenue
Portland, Oregon 97209

The reception will feature a reading at 6 pm by author M. Thomas Cooper. About Cooper's first novel, 42, Booklist wrote, "This unconventional thriller reads more like Kobo Abe or even Thomas Pynchon...Highly recommended for adventurous readers willing to expand the boundaries of genre fiction."

Cash bar. Hors d'oeuvres provided.

For more information, contact Amanda Taylor at ooligan.42@pdx.edu.

www.ooliganpress.pdx.edu/42.html

Event Spotlight: Summer Reading

It's that time again. Summer has hit full force (this weekend temperatures are supposed to hit 97 degrees) and besides digging last year's swimming suit out of the closet, it can only mean one thing:

Summer Reading at the Multnomah County Library!


For me, a part-time clerk at the North Portland branch, Summer Reading means many things: piles of red and blue T-shirts, multi-colored game boards, and little faces with chubby hands happily coming up to the desk, clutching coupons redeemable for any number of things— money off their fines, pizza, miniature golf—as well as other hard-earned prizes like T-shirts, books, and toys. There's even a grand prize drawing for a trip to Disneyland. And just how are these prizes earned? By reading, of course! Not only do kids get to win some really cool stuff, they also get to build reading skills with every prize they earn, instilling in them a lifetime love of reading. It's really a win-win for all involved.


And for those of us who wish we were still kid enough to read for prizes, never fear! We grown-ups can sign up for Read 4 Life and enter a cool drawing of our own: a trip to the Sylvia Beach Hotel in Newport. If you haven't been there, you're in for a treat. It truly is a refuge for book lovers, with themed rooms in honor of famous writers (the creepiest and equally most fascinating has to be The Edgar Allan Poe Room, with its large, looming stuffed crow). All you have to do is read at least four books this summer, write down the titles, and you're automatically entered into the drawing. Read more about both these great events at
http://www.multcolib.org/summer/about.html and http://www.multcolib.org/events/read4life.html

Wednesday, June 25, 2008

Industry Trend Spotlight: Out with the Memoir

Sales-wise, the memoir’s heyday is over. A recent panel of librarians at this year’s BookExpo America (http://bookexpoamerica.com/) pointed out that the market is saturated with memoirs right now, and readers just aren’t reading them. Though some publishers continue to publish memoirs, new memoir manuscripts are likely to be rejected unless the author is Barbara Walters or is running in the presidential election. Memoirs became overwhelmingly popular a few years ago after the release of A Million Little Pieces and Bob Dylan’s Chronicles.

Book trends come in tides. Given time, publishers and readers will once again be eager for memoirs. In the meantime, continue working on these projects on your own and with your editor, focusing on edits and revisions so your manuscript is ready when the time to submit to publishers or agents returns.

Instead, you might consider sending out how-to manuscripts that match the current economy—how to save money, live on a budget, decrease gas consumption, become a bicycle commuter, etc. Watch the news for more insight. See a problem/current event that you think you can help others solve or cope with? Write it down and submit to keen publishers!

Industry Trend Spotlight by Adriel Gorsuch, Indigo Editing, LLC

Sunday, June 22, 2008

Portland Literary Events

Monday, June 23
Joseph O’Neill will read from Netherland
Where: Powell’s Books at Cedar Hills Crossing, 3415 SW Cedar Hills Blvd
When: 7:00 p.m.
Cost: Free
For more info: http://www.powells.com/

Monday, June 23
Mary F. Pols will read from Accidentally on Purpose: A One-Night Stand, My Unplanned Parenthood, and Loving the Best Mistake I Ever Made
Where: Powell’s Books on Hawthorne, 3723 SE Hawthorne Blvd.
When: 7:30 p.m.
Cost: Free
For more info: http://www.powells.com/

Tuesday, June 24
Patricia Wood will read from Lottery
Where: Annie Bloom’s Bookstore, 7834 SW Capitol Highway
When: 7:30 p.m.
Cost: Free
For more info: http://www.annieblooms.com/NASApp/store/IndexJsp

Tuesday, June 24
Kathryn Harrison will read from While They Slept: An Inquiry Into the Murder of a Family
Where: Powell’s City of Books on Burnside, 1005 W Burnside
When: 7:30 p.m.
Cost: Free
For more info: http://www.powells.com/

Wednesday, June 25
Andre Dubus III will read from The Garden of Last Days
Where: Powell’s Books at Cedar Hills Crossing, 3415 SW Cedar Hills Blvd
When: 7:00 p.m.
Cost: Free
For more info: http://www.powells.com/

Thursday, June 26
Erik Lyle will read from On the Lower Frequencies: A Secret History of the City
Where: Reading Frenzy, 921 SW Oak St.
When: 7:00 p.m.
Cost: Free
For more info: http://www.readingfrenzy.com/

Thursday, June 26
Tony Wolk will read from Good Friday
Where: Powell’s Books on Hawthorne, 3723 SE Hawthorne Blvd.
When: 7:30 p.m.
Cost: Free
For more info: http://www.powells.com/

Thursday, June 26
Don Mankin will read from Riding the Hulahula to the Arctic Ocean: A Guide to Fifty Extraordinary Adventures for the Seasoned Traveler
Where: Powell’s City of Books on Burnside, 1005 W Burnside
When: 7:30 p.m.
Cost: Free
For more info: http://www.powells.com/

Friday, June 27
Chris Hedges will read from Collateral Damage: America’s War Against Iraqi Civilians
Where: Powell’s Books at Cedar Hills Crossing, 3415 SW Cedar Hills Blvd
When: 7:00 p.m.
Cost: Free
For more info: http://www.powells.com/

Friday, June 27
Peter Bagge will read from Apocalypse Nerd
Where: Powell’s City of Books on Burnside, 1005 W Burnside
When: 7:30 p.m.
Cost: Free
For more info: http://www.powells.com/

Wednesday, June 18, 2008

New Release Spotlight: Home

Home
by Marilynne Robinson

Anyone familiar with Marilynne Robinson’s work is familiar with her slow, thoughtful, sensitive style that not only allows the reader to understand every minute detail in thought and activity between her characters, but also allows the reader to feel what her characters feel, to empathize on a deeply emotional and spiritual level. Home carries this sensitivity toward character to its extreme, where almost no interaction or memory goes without scrutiny—and while this may seem tedious or plodding to some readers, it excellently portrays the complexity of human interaction, especially between family members with secrets.

Home is Marilynne Robinson’s third novel, and her first since Gilead, which won the Pulitzer Prize for fiction in 2005. It is also set in Gilead, Iowa, and occurs simultaneous to the events in Gilead, and deals with some of the same characters; but it does not require familiarity with its companion novel to be appreciated in its own right. It deals with the Boughton family, specifically the relationship between the dying patriarch and two of his most estranged children—Glory, a middle-aged high school English teacher, and Jack, the most beloved but also most wayward child of the family, who is an alcoholic and has been out of contact with the family for twenty years.

Much of the story focuses on the relationship between Jack and Glory, which seems to develop at first more out of necessity than anything else. However, as they become more comfortable with each other, they begin to find a way to deal with the past, as well as the present, through their mutual situation; this is where the novel is most emotionally compelling, as the reader is given almost unabated access to every subtlety and nuance of their interactions. For example, when Jack first arrives at the house in Gilead, he is hungover and asks Glory if he can rest awhile, and Glory responds, “‘It seems like old times, sneaking you upstairs with a bottle of aspirin.’ She had meant this as a joke of sorts, but he gave her a startled look, and she was sorry she had said it.” And this interaction, like most other interactions in the novel, is addressed again, and re-explained, later in the narrative.

Robinson’s command of her narrative is astounding. However, at times her command of language and syntax does not feel as confident or masterful as one familiar with her other work might expect. Perhaps this is due to the care she gives to the nuance and complexity of her characters, which is entirely forgivable—that which allows us to feel real empathy for fictional characters can probably allow us to overlook occasionally awkward language.

Robinson’s themes deal with family, history, and spirituality in a direct, human way. Early in the narrative, Robinson recounts how Jack and Glory’s father, Reverend Robert Boughton, suddenly loses a strong conviction for a minor issue “during a long night when his belief in the rightness of his position dissipated like mist, under no real scrutiny.” The spirituality of everyday life, coupled with the effects of time, allow her work to transcend the ordinary while remaining sensitive to the complexity and subtlety of all human life, regardless of belief or conviction.

Review by Caleb Murray, Indigo Editing, LLC

ISBN: 978-0-374-29910-1
Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux
Pub Date: Forthcoming (tentatively September 2008)
Hardcover: $25.00


Tuesday, June 17, 2008

Oregon Literary Fellowships application deadline is June 27, 2008

Oregon Literary Fellowships provide financial support to writers and independent publishers in Oregon.
  • Submission deadline is June 27, 2008
  • Minimum award amount is $2,500
  • Recipients will be announced in January 2009
Applications and guidelines are available on the Literary Arts web site, or by contacting Susan Denning at susan@literary-arts.org or 503-227-2583.

Monday, June 16, 2008

A New Spin on an Old Word

From MSN/Encarta:


"If you were asked to guess when the word e-mail was coined, chances are you'd say perhaps a couple of decades back. Would it surprise you to learn that the first use of the word is recorded from around the time of Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882)? Clearly, Emerson didn't use e-mail to send his manuscripts to his publisher. In fact, he couldn't even call his editor to ask when his next book was coming out -- there was no commercial telephone service then. In any case, if he missed e-mail, we can safely assume he didn't miss spam.

"What was e-mail doing at the time when there were no computers, telephones or even promises of large sums of Nigerian loot? Well, the answer is that it was a different type of e-mail. That e-mail meant enamel, as in the glossy paint applied to metal, pottery, etc. In French, the word émailler still means "to enamel," not to send out a message using electronic mail. The word mail in electronic mail is of Germanic origin, meaning a bag."


Read the rest of the article by Anu Garg and subscribe to his column, On Words with Anu Garg.

Sunday, June 15, 2008

Portland Literary Events

Monday, June 16
Chris Carlsson will read from Nowtopia: How Private Programmers, Outlaw Bicyclists, and Vacant-Lot Gardeners Are Inventing the Future Today!
Where: Powell’s Books on Hawthorne, 3723 SE Hawthorne Blvd.
When: 7:30 p.m.
Cost: Free
For more info: http://www.powells.com/

Monday, June 16
Stephen Wax will read from Kafka Comes to America
Where: Annie Bloom’s Bookstore, 7834 SW Capitol Highway
When: 7:30 p.m.
Cost: Free
For more info: http://www.annieblooms.com/NASApp/store/IndexJsp

Tuesday, June 17
Tim Josephs will read from A Camouflaged Flagrance of Decency
Where: The Human Bean, 998 SE Oak St., Hillsboro
When: 7:00 p.m.
Cost: Free
For more info: http://www.driveupcoffee.com/home/

Tuesday, June 17
Beren deMotier will read from The Brides of March: Memoir of a Same-Sex Marriage
Where: In Other Words, 8 NE Killingsworth St.
When: 6:30 p.m.
Cost: Free
For more info: http://www.inotherwords.org/NASApp/store/IndexJsp

Tuesday, June 17
Ed Park will read from Personal Days
Where: Powell’s City of Books on Burnside, 1005 W Burnside
When: 7:30 p.m.
Cost: Free
For more info: http://www.powells.com/

Wednesday, June 18
Dorothy Hearst will read from Promise of the Wolves
Where: Powell’s Books at Cedar Hills Crossing, 3415 SW Cedar Hills Blvd
When: 7:00 p.m.
Cost: Free
For more info: http://www.powells.com/

Thursday, June 19
Sasa Stanisic will read from How the Soldier Repairs the Gramophone
Where: Powell’s Books at Cedar Hills Crossing, 3415 SW Cedar Hills Blvd
When: 7:00 p.m.
Cost: Free
For more info: http://www.powells.com/

Thursday, June 19
Patricia Santana will read from Ghosts of El Grullo
Where: Annie Bloom’s Bookstore, 7834 SW Capitol Highway
When: 7:30 p.m.
Cost: Free
For more info: http://www.annieblooms.com/NASApp/store/IndexJsp

Thursday, June 19
John Price will read from Man Killed by Pheasant and Other Mishaps
Where: Powell’s Books on Hawthorne, 3723 SE Hawthorne Blvd.
When: 7:30 p.m.
Cost: Free
For more info: http://www.powells.com/

Friday, June 20
Jessica Abel and Matt Madden will read from Drawing Words and Writing Pictures
Where: Powell’s City of Books on Burnside, 1005 W Burnside
When: 7:30 p.m.
Cost: Free
For more info: http://www.powells.com/

Friday, June 13, 2008

Upcoming Reading: Tim Josephs


Tim Josephs, author of A Camouflaged Fragrance of Decency, will be giving a reading Tuesday, June 17 at 7:00 p.m. It will take place at The Human Bean, 998 SE Oak St., Hillsboro, OR 97123.

Please check out Tim Josephs' website: http://www.timjosephs.com/

ISBN: 978-1-59299-308-6

Publisher: Inkwater Press

Paperback: $17.95

Wednesday, June 11, 2008

Book Launch Parties: Friday, June 13

The book release party for Tribal Vision: A Celebration of Life Through Belly Dance, written by Paulette Rees-Denis and published by Cultivator Press, will be this Friday, June 13. It will take place at Ink and Paper Group, 1825 SE 7th, from 4:30 to 7:30.

The book release party for Celtic Folk Soul, written by Jen Delyth and published by Amber Lotus, will also be on Friday. It will be held at Talisman Gallery, 1476 NE Alberta, at 7:00 p.m. The reading will begin at 8:00 p.m.

Indigo Editing's Ali McCart and Kristin Thiel both worked as editors on these books. Please join us at one or both of these book launch parties on Friday!

New Release Spotlight: Catching Boo

Catching Boo by Joanne Rowlinson
Illustrations by Mari Brown

What happens when a husband and wife who live by a lake want a dog, get a dog, and lose a dog? According to Catching Boo, the verdict still isn’t out. While the book by Joanne Rowlinson tries to answer these questions with rhyme and repetition, the result is an effort that is attempted but not fully realized.

At the center of all this is Boo, a dog who comes into the lives of a middle-aged couple when they want him most. When Boo runs away, the duo try their best to find him, and are helped along the way by a colorful band of well-meaning but ineffective neighbors (“ ‘We’ll trap him I know,’ said the boy with a net. ‘It works on T.V.’ It had no effect.”) until, magically, Boo is found and back to stay. While these characters give the book a certain textured and vibrant feel, the true meat of the story is never addressed or explained. We never know where Boo came from, why he ran away, and most of all, why he came back. These questions are at the heart of the story and because they are never answered, the resolution of Boo coming back to the family is less powerful and deserved than it could be.

That’s not to say this book isn’t worth the read. The watercolor illustrations by Mari Brown are both quirky and expertly rendered, which made me want to keep turning every page. Perhaps the cutest thing of all is a little sparrow that appears on every page and assists in the search for Boo, which will surely delight children and adults alike. Rowlinson also does a good job with repetition in her text, which will appeal to younger readers, and succeeds in creating a varied cast of original characters who embody what it must be like to live in a close-knit, lakeside community. As this was based on a true story, and a portion of the proceeds will go to benefit the Humane Society, the real meaning here may be in the generosity and selflessness of an entire community, rather than why a dog may have run away.


Review by Andrea Deeken, Indigo Editing, LLC

ISBN 978-0-9739962-2-7
Publisher: Pipsqueak Publishing
Pub date: Forthcoming
Hardcover: $18.95

Sunday, June 08, 2008

Portland Literary Events

Monday, June 9
David Guterson will read from The Other
Where: Powell’s Books at Cedar Hills Crossing, 3415 SW Cedar Hills Blvd
When: 7:00 p.m.
Cost: Free
For more info: http://www.powells.com/

Monday, June 9
Richard Bausch will read from Peace
Where: Powell’s City of Books on Burnside, 1005 W Burnside
When: 7:30 p.m.
Cost: Free
For more info: http://www.powells.com/

Tuesday, June 10
Richard Preston will read from Panic in Level 4: Cannibals, Killer Viruses, and Other Journeys to the Edge of Science
Where: Powell’s Books at Cedar Hills Crossing, 3415 SW Cedar Hills Blvd
When: 7:00 p.m.
Cost: Free
For more info: http://www.powells.com/

Tuesday, June 10
Gina Dagget and Kathy Belge will read from Lipstick and Dipstick’s Essential Guide to Lesbian Relationships
Where: Broadway Books, 1714 NE Broadway
When: 7:00 p.m.
Cost: Free
For more info: http://wweek.com/events/latest/words/#34.29

Tuesday, June 10
Dalia Sofer will read from The Septembers of Shiraz
Where: Powell’s City of Books on Burnside, 1005 W Burnside
When: 7:30 p.m.
Cost: Free
For more info: http://www.powells.com/

Wednesday, June 11
Jen Sookfong Lee will read from The End of East
Where: Powell’s Books at Cedar Hills Crossing, 3415 SW Cedar Hills Blvd
When: 7:00 p.m.
Cost: Free
For more info: http://www.powells.com/

Wednesday, June 11
Kerry Cohen will read from Loose Girl: A Memoir of Promiscuity
Where: Powell’s City of Books on Burnside, 1005 W Burnside
When: 7:30 p.m.
Cost: Free
For more info: http://www.powells.com/

Thursday, June 12
George Lakoff will read from The Political Mind: Why You Can’t Understand 21st-Century American Politics with an 18th-Century Brain
Where: The Bagdad Theater, 3702 SE Hawthorne Blvd.
When: 7:00 p.m.
Cost: $26.00
For more info: http://www.powells.com/, http://www.mcmenamins.com/index.php?loc=9&id=1117

Friday, June 13
Salman Rushdie will read from The Enchantress of Florence
Where: Powell’s Books at Cedar Hills Crossing, 3415 SW Cedar Hills Blvd
When: 7:00 p.m.
Cost: Free
For more info: http://www.powells.com/

Friday, June 13
David Sirota will read from The Uprising: An Unauthorized Tour of the Populist Revolt Scaring Wall Street and Washington
Where: Powell’s City of Books on Burnside, 1005 W Burnside
When: 7:30 p.m.
Cost: Free
For more info: http://www.powells.com/

Wednesday, June 04, 2008

New Release Spotlight: Curse of the Spellmans

Curse of the Spellmans
by Lisa Lutz


“Without a doubt the restraining order put a cramp in my investigation of Subject.”

That’s not how the second in Lisa Lutz’s series on the Spellman family of private investigators starts. No, a lot more happens before thirty-year-old Izzy Spellman is legally restrained from being near her parents’ neighbor/subject of her own personal investigation/boyfriend.

The Spellman parents run a PI firm, and daughters Izzy and Rae help them; Izzy’s been spying since she was twelve and Rae since she was six. Oldest child David has long distanced himself from the family and its business, becoming a lawyer whose only connection to their work is to sometimes send business to them. The problem is that Izzy, in particular, just can’t stop. Everyone is a suspect to her, and with the help of a portable recorder, she has transcripts of lots of conversations, from witness interviews for actual cases to her mother suggesting to the cop Rae has befriended that he pose as Izzy’s fianc√© so that the social worker will stop bugging the family about age-inappropriate friendships.

That kind of device works in the book—what would a first-person narration by a PI be without some transcripts?—but the copious use of footnotes doesn’t. Why do readers even need to be told, “5Morty likes to Yiddishify my name” in reference to her lawyer calling her “Izzila”? And wouldn’t it be stronger to just include “1Who happened to be my partner in crime during most of my delinquent years” at the end of the sentence, “Now David is a lawyer married to my best friend, Petra” instead of in a footnote?

Izzy is an incredibly immature thirty-year-old, which is what leads to a lot of the mishaps and miscommunications that drive a funny-snappy/funny-silly beach read like Curse of the Spellmans. This “charm” would be completely off-putting—when Izzy spends the night at her boyfriend’s, the startled reader may have to remind herself that Izzy’s not a teenager but a grown woman—but Lutz redeems Izzy in a couple ways. This female screwball-detective-novel character is not a “dumb broad.” Her lack of social graces just makes her refreshingly outspoken and frank. And while this reviewer isn’t in the habit of rewarding anyone for being immature, the current media trend—in ads, in movies, and the like—is for men to be unsettled goofballs and women to be super-responsible homemaker CEOs. So if we ever have to go the route of, if you can’t beat ’em join ’em, finally, finally here’s a grown woman who is allowed to follow her impulses, no matter how selfish.

Review by Kristin Thiel, Indigo Editing, LLC

ISBN: 978-1-4165-3241-5; 1-4165-3241-2
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
Pub Date: March 2008
Hardcover: $25.00

Monday, June 02, 2008

Declaration Editing now Accepting Poetry Submissions

Declaration Editing is now accepting submissions for Four and Twenty, an innovative short form poetry journal.

The guidelines are simple. All poems must be four lines or less, containing a maximum of twenty words. There is no set theme for the journal; however, all submissions will be judged on their ability to create a vivid picture, evoke an emotional response, or use clever, original wordplay. No previously published poems will be accepted.

For a full description of our submission guidelines, including author rights and permissions, please visit www.declarationeditng.com.

E-mail all submissions to 4and20@declarationediting.com.

The submission deadline is Friday June 27, 2008.

Four Lines. Twenty Words.
Be Creative. Be Succinct.

About Declaration Editing

Declaration Editing is a collective of local freelance editors dedicated to helping authors achieve their publishing goals. Our knowledgeable staff works in genres ranging from fiction and children's literature to non-fiction and poetry. Information about Declaration's editors and the services they offer can be found online at www.declarationediting.com.

Mistakes Happen to the Best of Us, or, The Importance of Line Editing and Proofreading

Here's a tale of a big editing goof and the amazing and good resolution. (Reading this story, you might just find yourself perusing more of the blog's posts—an interesting look at policing and the war on drugs. And, of course, who doesn't like a blogger who, though not writing about writing, still makes comments on grammar?)

Sunday, June 01, 2008

Portland Literary Events

Sunday, June 1
Carl Zimmer will read from Microcosm: E. Coli and the New Science of Life
Where: Powell’s City of Books on Burnside, 1005 W Burnside
When: 7:30 p.m.
Cost: Free
For more info: http://www.powells.com/

Monday, June 2
Gail Carson Levine will read from Ever
Where: A Children’s Place Bookstore, 4807 NE Fremont
When: 10:00 a.m.
Cost: Free
For more info: http://www.achildrensplacebookstore.com/

Monday, June 2
Jeffrey Lewis will read from Adam the King
Where: Powell’s Books at Cedar Hills Crossing, 3415 SW Cedar Hills Blvd
When: 7:00 p.m.
Cost: Free
For more info: http://www.powells.com/

Monday, June 2
Tim Winton will read from Breath
Where: Powell’s City of Books on Burnside, 1005 W Burnside
When: 7:30 p.m.
Cost: Free
For more info: http://www.powells.com/

Tuesday, June 3
Brian Doyle will read from Thirsty for the Joy
Where: Broadway Books, 1714 NE Broadway
When: 7:00 p.m.
Cost: Free
For more info: http://www.powells.com/

Wednesday, June 4
Thomas J. Campanella will read from The Concrete Dragon: China’s Urban Revolution and What It Means for the World
Where: Powell’s City of Books on Burnside, 1005 W Burnside
When: 7:30 p.m.
Cost: Free
For more info: http://www.powells.com/

Wednesday, June 4
Wilford Welch will read from The Tactics of Hope
Where: Annie Bloom’s Books, 7834 SW Capitol Highway
When: 7:30 p.m.
Cost: Free
For more info: http://www.annieblooms.com/NASApp/store/IndexJsp

Thursday, June 5
Nam Le will read from The Boat
Where: Powell’s Books on Hawthorne, 3723 SE Hawthorne Blvd.
When: 7:30 p.m.
Cost: Free
For more info: http://www.powells.com/

Thursday, June 5
Anne Wright will read from Dissent: Voices of Conscience
Where: Annie Bloom’s Books, 7834 SW Capitol Highway
When: 7:30 p.m.
Cost: Free
For more info: http://www.annieblooms.com/NASApp/store/IndexJsp

Friday, June 6
John Perkins will read from The Secret History of the American Empire
Where: Powell’s City of Books on Burnside, 1005 W Burnside
When: 7:30 p.m.
Cost: Free
For more info: http://www.powells.com/

Saturday, June 7
Robert Thurman will read from Why the Dalai Lama Matters: His Act of Truth as the Solution for China, Tibet and the World
Where: The Bagdad Theater, 3702 SE Hawthorne Blvd.
When: 3:00 p.m.
Cost: $24.00
For more info: http://www.powells.com/, http://www.mcmenamins.com/index.php?loc=9&id=1117